Education


The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Committee on Architecture for Education (CAE) has selected 12 projects for this year’s CAE Education Facility Design Awards. The program honors educational facilities that the jury believes should serve as an example of a superb place in which to learn, furthering the client’s mission, goals and educational program while demonstrating excellence in architectural design.

Contact Matt Tinder (mtinder@aia.org) for high resolution images.

Henderson-Hopkins School; Baltimore

Award of Excellence

ROGERS PARTNERS

Associate Architect: Architects+Urban Designers

A 125,000-square-foot, K-8 partnership school and early childhood center is a progressive learning environment for children and a laboratory for the next generation of educators. The school is a cluster of “containers for learning” inspired by East Baltimore’s row houses, stoops, and social civic spaces. Through its intentionally porous, safe, urban plan, and the craftsmanship of light, materiality and performance, its design respects history and supports the future of education and of its neighborhood.

Mundo Verde Bilingual Public Charter School; Washington, DC

Award of Excellence

Studio Twenty Seven Architecture

Mundo Verde is a bilingual, sustainability-focused public charter that consists of two buildings: the renewed and refined historic school and a new Pre-K annex. Within the older building, breakout nooks and cubbies are carved from the generous corridors and abandoned ventilation chases. New windows provide natural light to the building core. As in the Annex, high ceilings and grand window expanses are supported by highly coordinated building system integration. The Pre-K annex facade is designed to be deferential to the historic school. A third floor learning terrace, large window openings, and building orientation provide for light-filled classrooms which frame the natural landscape of the interior play court.

Regional Plant 2 Teaching Facility, Wake Technical Community College; Raleigh, NC

Award of Excellence

Clark Nexsen

Located at the entrance of Wake Tech Community College, building creates a gateway to the campus and symbolizes the merging of technology, education and sustainability. While the primary function of the Regional Plant is to house heating and cooling systems, the project was an opportunity to highlight the striking aesthetic of building technology and to create a unique educational experience that reveals technology’s role in preserving the beauty of the natural world. The building serves as an educational facility for teaching students about energy efficient building systems. A simple rectilinear glass and steel box with a perforated metal screen layer houses, screens and displays the technology and creates a unique educational space for the college.

Richard Ivey Building, Richard Ivey School of Business, Western University; London, Ontario, Canada

Award of Excellence

Hariri Pontarini Architects

Echoing the architecture of Western University’s campus, a full height great hall anchors the main circulation, with the dining hall, library and amphitheatre extending into the surrounding landscape as distinct pavilions. Designing from the inside out, the architects created spaces that support Ivey’s unique case-based and team learning pedagogy. The research-based design process involved numerous workshops and a survey of 60 top business schools. The building’s materials—stone, concrete, glass, copper, steel, walnut, and Douglas fir—were selected for their elemental and timeless qualities. Innovative site strategies and embedded technologies were employed to achieve a sustainable design.

Seton Hill Arts Center, Seton Hill University; Greensburg, PA

Award of Excellence

designLAB architects

Associate Architect: BSHM Architects

Channeling the Pittsburgh area’s industrial heritage, the steel frame and metal clad building was conceived as a “Factory for the Arts.” The project features an outdoor Arts Yard where the making of 3D arts is visible from the commercial Main Street in its host city of Greensburg. The four-level facility features a full complement of studio spaces for traditional disciplines like painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, dance and theater, along with tech-heavy digital and graphic arts. The new building is an economic catalyst for the city’s cultural district, drawing local artists, gallery observers, and performing arts attendees to support and critique student work.

Vol Walker Hall Renovation & The Steven L. Anderson Design Center, University of Arkansas; Fayetteville, AR

Award of Excellence

Marlon Blackwell Architects

Associate Architect: Polk Stanley Wilcox Architects

The addition provides 37,000 square feet of new studio, faculty office, and seminar space as well as a 200 seat auditorium and an exhibition gallery. This project is a complex but resolute hybrid of a historic restoration and a contemporary insertion and expansion. Post-tensioned concrete and Indiana limestone honor the weight and substance of the historic, while the west-facing fritted glass brise-soleil and steel curtainwall create a contemporary figure. The overall design is a didactic model, establishing a tangible discourse between past and present, while providing state of the art facilities for 21st century architectural and design education.

Dwight-Englewood School Hajjar STEM Center; Englewood, NJ

Award of Merit

Gensler

This new building at Dwight-Englewood embodies the school’s STEM mission, while still blending into the existing campus. Designers found inspiration in the integrative STEM curriculum to create a facility that fosters a cross-disciplinary community and is adaptable to change. Inside, seven flexible classrooms and eight science labs center around a double height community area that serves as an “Innovation Hub” where students are free to explore. Moveable furniture, audio-visual capabilities and writable surfaces encourage students to “hack” the space and their own learning process. Contrasting with the classrooms’ brick and wood façades, the warm cedar exterior also allows the building’s character to shift with the seasons.

Fayetteville High School Addition and Renovation; Fayetteville, AR

Award of Merit

Hight Jackson Associates

Associate Architect: DLR Group and Marlon Blackwell Architects

To maintain its competitive advantage in academics, Fayetteville Public Schools tasked the design team to strategically re-structure its high school education program into a small learning community (SLC) model. At more than 500,000 square feet, this project is the largest civic project in Fayetteville over the past 50 years. SLCs are designed with core learning studios that feature discovery, project-based learning, digital and applied learning labs to foster collaboration. Distributed administration, resource centers and dining allow students to spend a majority of their day within their SLC. The addition features abundant glass and overlooks a new landscaped street that creates a collegiate campus feel reflective of the school’s ties to the University of Arkansas.

GateWay Community College Integrated Education Building; Phoenix

Award of Merit

SmithGroupJJR

As an anchor in the heart of campus, this 122,000-square-foot facility meshes an entire new campus of functions into a single three-story structure. The building integrates mediated classrooms with life and physical science labs, a campus library, learning center, one-stop-shop for student services, and a multi-purpose classroom for performing arts. Outdoor spaces, both at grade and at the upper levels of the building, provide a popular amenity and an enhancement to student community life. Such spaces include an accessible roof deck and other educational areas catering to different college and community functions throughout the year. The project is targeting LEED Gold Certification.

Harvard Business School, Tata Hall; Boston

Award of Merit

William Rawn Associates, Architects, Inc.

Located on the banks of the Charles River, the arc-shaped building creates a porous edge to the campus and a new sense of openness between the school and the city of Boston. Dedicated to the Executive Education program the building groups students into clusters of eight-person suites, each with a common space for work, collaboration and presentations. The detailing and performance of the exterior facade allows the transparency of the ground floors to expose the public parts of the building.

Indian Springs School; Birmingham, AL

Award of Merit

Lake|Flato Architects

Associate Architect: Architecture Works

The 350-acre boarding and day school campus, originally planned by the Olmstead Brothers, was functional and serviceable but aging facilities were inhibiting the growth of educational programs and opportunities. This first phase of a comprehensive master plan includes new academic and administrative buildings and complementary landscapes that create a memorable, meaningful place. Porch ceilings and overhangs are crafted of wood and are natural frames of the surrounding environment. Roof monitors on the buildings provide daylighting to each classroom, while a storefront system and high-performance glazing afford views along the covered walkways and to the campus beyond. The project is targeting LEED Silver certification.

Kennedy Child Study Center; East Harlem, NY

Award of Merit

Pell Overton Architects

Renovating a 1930’s warehouse building, the design team’s adaptive reuse of the 25,000-square-foot space presented a number of difficult challenges, including an unusually low ceiling and absence of any natural light. In response, one primary design feature took the form of a series of large, colorful lighting bays cut into the otherwise smooth ceiling effectively creating the perception of greater height and illumination from above. To further address the compressed nature of the lower floor, the administrative offices are arranged around two large open work areas, providing direct visual access to new windows and allowing natural daylight to filter deeper into the floor.

The jury for the 2016 Educational Facility Design Awards includes: Karina Ruiz, AIA (Chair), DOWA-IBI Group Architects; Christina Alvarez, Delaware Design Lab HS; Helena L. Jubany, FAIA, NAC/Architecture; Bruce Lindsey, AIA, Washington University in St. Louis; Zachary Neubauer, University of Portland and Steve Ziger, AIA, Ziger/Snead Architects.

About The American Institute of Architects

Founded in 1857, the American Institute of Architects consistently works to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings, neighborhoods, and communities. Through nearly 300 state and local chapters, the AIA advocates for public policies that promote economic vitality and public wellbeing. Members adhere to a code of ethics and conduct to ensure the highest professional standards. The AIA provides members with tools and resources to assist them in their careers and business as well as engaging civic and government leaders and the public to find solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation and world. Visit http://www.aia.org.

Contact

Matt Tinder
202-626-7462
EMAIL

Some schools have banned junk food. Some have added longer gym classes, new nutrition classes, or even required standing desks. But childhood obesity rates are still about three times higher than they were in 1980. Now schools are adding another tool to the fight for fitter kids: Architecture.

A 1950s-era elementary school in rural Buckingham, Virginia was redesigned to help kids lose weight. The architects worked directly with public health researchers to change a long list of details based on current research, from designing a kitchen with dedicated storage space for local, seasonal fruit, to placing healthy meals at kids’-eye level in the checkout line. In a teaching kitchen, third-graders can learn to make healthy meals from the foods they grow in the school garden.

“We all know statistics about the childhood obesity epidemic, and we all know that despite our best efforts working very intensely at the individual level—or even at the population level—we haven’t made as much of an inroad as we really want to,” says Matt Trowbridge, an associate professor at the University of Virginia, who helped create the design guidelines.

The design of a school itself might matter as much as something like a gym class. “The environments in which we live affect not just our behaviors, but our lifelong attitudes about things like healthy eating and active lifestyles,” he says. “It’s also clear that it’s so much better to help prevent children from becoming obese than to try to help adults lose weight. So that makes school environments incredibly important.”

Combing through all of the available studies on school design and healthy eating, they came up with a list of dozens of design strategies architects can use. At the Virginia elementary school, one of the keys was making the commercial kitchen visible from the dining room, so students could watch as their lunch is made. Nearby, the teaching kitchen gives them a kid-safe way to learn how to make their own food, and a food lab was designed for food-related science experiments.

Some of the design guidelines are more subtle, like placing salad bars near checkout stations, or deliberately adding space in a kitchen for preparing fresh food (and eliminating deep fryers). Beyond the healthy eating interventions, the school was also designed to keep kids more active, with features like inviting stairways, walking paths, and furniture that flexes as students sit, so they aren’t completely still.

The school gardens also offer community space for growing food, so whole families can start eating healthier. “We are dealing with entire communities, rural-to-urban, that are struggling with healthy food access and food deserts,” says Dina Sorensen, project designer from VMDO, the architecture firm that redesigned the elementary school. “How can those communities impart the value and importance of healthy food at school in the context of their own need to re-build healthy food infrastructure?” The Buckingham project, she says, shows a school truly becoming a community asset and a teaching tool.

Since the school was built in 2013, the architects have continued to use the healthy eating design guidelines in other school projects. The guidelines are also free for other designers to use. A redesign can have a major impact; Sorensen points out that most school buildings are at least 50 years old, with “kitchens and cafeterias that have hardly been touched since the idea of school lunch came about in the 1930s.”

“We can’t just change what’s on the menu and expect to see the changes we hope to find in children,” Sorensen says. The key, she says, is for architects to work with multi-disciplinary teams, since a single group or solution on its own likely can’t make enough of a change in health.

It’s an idea that’s quickly spreading. The American Institute of Architects now has a “design and health” leadership group with a team of experts from a range of fields. And similar collaborations are starting to happen for other social issues.

“Architects are expert at designing buildings, not studying people and their behaviors or the impact architecture has on a whole spectrum of human and ecological systems,” says Sorensen. “But we can collaborate and cross-pollinate with those who do, and marvel at the results of a new architecture for the sustainable future.”

Some schools have banned junk food. Some have added longer gym classes, new nutrition classes, or even required standing desks. But childhood obesity rates are still about three times higher than they were in 1980. Now schools are adding another tool to the fight for fitter kids: Architecture.

A 1950s-era elementary school in rural Buckingham, Virginia was redesigned to help kids lose weight. The architects worked directly with public health researchers to change a long list of details based on current research, from designing a kitchen with dedicated storage space for local, seasonal fruit, to placing healthy meals at kids’-eye level in the checkout line. In a teaching kitchen, third-graders can learn to make healthy meals from the foods they grow in the school garden.

“We all know statistics about the childhood obesity epidemic, and we all know that despite our best efforts working very intensely at the individual level—or even at the population level—we haven’t made as much of an inroad as we really want to,” says Matt Trowbridge, an associate professor at the University of Virginia, who helped create the design guidelines.

The design of a school itself might matter as much as something like a gym class. “The environments in which we live affect not just our behaviors, but our lifelong attitudes about things like healthy eating and active lifestyles,” he says. “It’s also clear that it’s so much better to help prevent children from becoming obese than to try to help adults lose weight. So that makes school environments incredibly important.”

Combing through all of the available studies on school design and healthy eating, they came up with a list of dozens of design strategies architects can use. At the Virginia elementary school, one of the keys was making the commercial kitchen visible from the dining room, so students could watch as their lunch is made. Nearby, the teaching kitchen gives them a kid-safe way to learn how to make their own food, and a food lab was designed for food-related science experiments.

Some of the design guidelines are more subtle, like placing salad bars near checkout stations, or deliberately adding space in a kitchen for preparing fresh food (and eliminating deep fryers). Beyond the healthy eating interventions, the school was also designed to keep kids more active, with features like inviting stairways, walking paths, and furniture that flexes as students sit, so they aren’t completely still.

Since the school was built in 2013, the architects have continued to use the healthy eating design guidelines in other school projects. The guidelines are also free for other designers to use. A redesign can have a major impact; Sorensen points out that most school buildings are at least 50 years old, with “kitchens and cafeterias that have hardly been touched since the idea of school lunch came about in the 1930s.”

“We can’t just change what’s on the menu and expect to see the changes we hope to find in children,” Sorensen says. The key, she says, is for architects to work with multi-disciplinary teams, since a single group or solution on its own likely can’t make enough of a change in health.

The school gardens also offer community space for growing food, so whole families can start eating healthier. “We are dealing with entire communities, rural-to-urban, that are struggling with healthy food access and food deserts,” says Dina Sorensen, project designer from VMDO, the architecture firm that redesigned the elementary school. “How can those communities impart the value and importance of healthy food at school in the context of their own need to re-build healthy food infrastructure?” The Buckingham project, she says, shows a school truly becoming a community asset and a teaching tool.

Since the school was built in 2013, the architects have continued to use the healthy eating design guidelines in other school projects. The guidelines are also free for other designers to use. A redesign can have a major impact; Sorensen points out that most school buildings are at least 50 years old, with “kitchens and cafeterias that have hardly been touched since the idea of school lunch came about in the 1930s.”

“We can’t just change what’s on the menu and expect to see the changes we hope to find in children,” Sorensen says. The key, she says, is for architects to work with multi-disciplinary teams, since a single group or solution on its own likely can’t make enough of a change in health.

It’s an idea that’s quickly spreading. The American Institute of Architects now has a “design and health” leadership group with a team of experts from a range of fields. And similar collaborations are starting to happen for other social issues.

“Architects are expert at designing buildings, not studying people and their behaviors or the impact architecture has on a whole spectrum of human and ecological systems,” says Sorensen. “But we can collaborate and cross-pollinate with those who do, and marvel at the results of a new architecture for the sustainable future.” –

Tucked in the far corner of the giant exhibition hall at the New Orleans Convention Center, a 560-square-foot modular classroom designed by New Orleans architecture firm Eskew+Dumez+Ripple quietly made its public debut at Greenbuild.

The building has numerous sustainable elements: LED lighting, photovoltaic panels, a folding wall for natural ventilation, a planted wire mesh screen on the south side for shade, and a butterfly-shaped roof to route stormwater to cisterns used to irrigate wetland garden plots that will be planted next door to the classroom once it is permanently moved to the Lower 9th Ward.

Constructed by Metairie, Louisiana-based design-build firm Broadmoor, the structure will serve as an on-site K-12 environmental education center and research space for the Lower 9th Ward Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development (CSED), a local environmental organization founded a year after Hurricane Katrina. It will be installed near the Bayou Bienvenue Wetlands Triangle viewing platform, built in 2008 to raise local awareness about decades of wetlands degradation and renewed environmental clean up efforts in the storm-ravaged, still recovering community.

View slide show.

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Committee on Architecture for Education (CAE) has selected 11 educational and cultural facilities for this year’s CAE Educational Facility Design Awards. The CAE Design Excellence Award honors educational facilities that the jury believes should serve as an example of a superb place in which to learn, furthering the client’s mission, goals and educational program while demonstrating excellence in architectural design. These projects exemplify innovation through the client’s educational goals through responsive and responsible programming, planning and design. Function and surrounding regional and community context are valued as part of the planning and design process as well as sustainability.

Media interested in obtaining high resolution images, please contact Matt Tinder: mtinder@aia.org

Baltimore Design School; Baltimore
Ziger/Snead Architects

Baltimore Design School is a new Baltimore City Public combined middle and high school with a focus on fashion, architecture, and graphic design. The new school is created from an abandoned historic factory building. The building’s transformation from blight to a state-of-the-art facility within the confines of a minimal budget demonstrates the power of design through best practices for historic renovation, adaptive reuse, educational design, and sustainable design. A driving force in creating the school was the desire to develop creativity and design-informed critical thinking skills for public school students.

Buckingham County Primary & Elementary Schools at the Carter G. Woodson Education Complex; Dillwyn, VA
VMDO Architects, P.C.

Two Virginia mid-century schools are transformed into a cutting-edge, holistic learning environment for K-5 students with the aim to promote connectivity, creativity, health, and well-being. Evidence-based healthy design principles – integrated in the campus landscape and co-created by the client, architect, and a team of public health researchers – promote healthy eating, nutrition education, physical activity, and well-being as a response to the national childhood obesity epidemic. The campus works to unlock the health and learning potential of 21st-century students while fostering design-research partnerships that re-define sustainability, human health, and professional collaboration.

Drexel University College of Media Arts and Design (CoMAD) URBN Center; Philadelphia
MSR (Meyer, Scherer & Rockcastle, Ltd.)

The respectful repurposing of a landmark Venturi, Scott Brown decorated shed provides a new home for Drexel University’s College of Media Arts and Design. Key goals driving the project include bringing together disparate departments in one location and encouraging cross-collaboration between disciplines. To transform the former 130,000 square-foot office building and 13,000 square-foot annex, the designers embraced the realities of the shed—a cost-effective, four-story commercial box. The design concept focuses on respecting the original intent, making more with less, offering adaptable spaces for learning, and providing opportunities for learning through presentation.

University of Chicago Child Development Center – Stony Island; Chicago
Wheeler Kearns Architects

When faced with the question “How do you design a day care for the children of future Nobel laureates?”, one approach seemed promising. Instead of creating another place dominated by primary colors and synthetic play equipment, children could be offered an opportunity to discover natural phenomena in the natural world. Discovering first principles first-hand surrounded by minimally processed natural materials. Consequently, the design emphasizes the natural landscape over the built-one, centered around two playscapes with a footprint larger than the building itself. The playscapes conceptually graft onto the historic Frederick Law Olmstead landscape located across the street in Jackson Park. Materials constructed by nature either from the atmosphere (trees, plants, wood) or from the earth (boulders, rocks, sand) dominate.

Wilkes Elementary School; Bainbridge Island, WA
Mahlum

Wilkes Elementary School was designed to support dynamic styles of teaching and learning. Classrooms are located at the heart and linked on each end, providing a circulation pattern that prevents both the feeling and effect of isolation. Clusters of classrooms break down the scale and create four intimate learning communities. This arrangement also fosters collaboration and connectivity, and creates opportunities for variation in scales of learning – from multi-classroom gatherings, to intimate individual experiences. Wilkes addresses the needs of the whole child, so that powerful learning happens everywhere.

Central Arizona College, Maricopa Campus; Maricopa, AZ
SmithGroupJJR

Known for its history as a pre-railroad stagecoach town, the town of Maricopa has balanced its agricultural and Native American identities for the past century. Most recently Maricopa, a community 40 miles south of Phoenix, has been chronicled by the New York Times as a bedroom community boomtown gone bust. Central Arizona College has made an investment in the community and is betting on its future. This campus represents a glimmer of hope in an area struck by the national recession.

Coastline Community College, Newport Beach Campus; Newport Beach, CA
LPA, INC

The new interdisciplinary Newport Beach Campus provides a total of approximately 66,800 square feet to Coastline Community College, as well as hardscape and landscape. The project also includes construction of a 260-space, on-site, parking lot directly adjacent to the structure. Key sustainable features, such as storm water management, natural ventilation, green roofs, living walls, maximized daylight and views of the ocean, are highlighted to achieve LEED Gold rating. The project exceeds CA Title 24 energy code by 33%.

James B. Hunt Jr. Library at North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC
Architect: Clark Nexsen Associated Firm: Snohetta

Large open spaces connect all floors of the library, and the use of stairs is emphasized to ensure an interactive and social environment in-between more focused study areas. Designed to LEED® Silver requirements, the building features abundant natural light and expansive views of the nearby lake. Fritted glass and a fixed external aluminum shading system help diminish heat gain and maximize views and ambient natural light. Ceiling-mounted active chilled beams and radiant panels provide heating and cooling. Rain gardens and green roofs manage storm water.

Nathan Hale High School Modernization; Seattle
Mahlum

Nathan Hale is a progressive, public high school known for its collaborative, presentation-based curriculum and strong community connection. This significant facility modernization and addition to the 1960’s structure creates a flexible teaching facility that puts student life at the center of the school and unites the campus community. The design allows the building to breathe fresh air and daylight while respecting the existing structural rhythm. Light-filled halls and classrooms, as well the building transparency, express the school’s values and provide a healthy, inspirational environment.

PAVE Academy Charter School; Brooklyn, NY
Mitchell | Giurgola Architects, LLP

PAVE Academy is a 450-seat K-8 public charter school located on an isolated corner lot in the Red Hook section of Brooklyn. The design of the school was informed by the PAVE leadership team whose goals included creating a community friendly school that would support significant parent involvement – essential to student success – and the needs of a particularly high-needs population living in poverty. Children arrive early for a quiet breakfast and stay well into the afternoon with learning and play to fill a void many face at home.

Raisbeck Aviation High School; Tukwila, WA
Bassetti Architects

Raisbeck Aviation High School was conceived as a response to Highline School District’s proximity to the aviation industry, a deep desire to give students access to college and engineering professions, and an educational vision that melds hands-on, project-based learning with academic rigor. The new 400-student STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) school enables students to flourish through co-location with the Museum of Flight and immersion in aerospace and aviation. The design supports this program physically, visually, and symbolically with project labs for aircraft and robotics construction, state-of-the-art science labs, classrooms, and a multi-purpose gathering space. Even the image of the school reflects its mission with its streamlined, carefully crafted form, inspired by the leading edge of a wing.

The 2014 CAE Educational Facility Design Awards jury includes: John R. Dale, FAIA (Chair), Harley Ellis Devereaux; Claire Gallagher, Assoc. AIA, Georgian Court University, School of Education; Fred Dust, IDEO; Dutch MacDonald, AIA, MAYA Design and Marsha Maytum, FAIA, Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects.

About The American Institute of Architects
Founded in 1857, members of the American Institute of Architects consistently work to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings, neighborhoods, and communities. Through nearly 300 state and local chapters, the AIA advocates for public policies that promote economic vitality and public well being. Members adhere to a code of ethics and conduct to ensure the highest professional standards. The AIA provides members with tools and resources to assist them in their careers and business as well as engaging civic and government leaders, and the public to find solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation and world. Visit http://www.aia.org.

See slide show from BSA Life Structures.

Planning, Architecture, Engineering, Interiors

BSA LifeStructures designs facilities that support, enhance and inspire healing, learning and discovery. Facilities that are lifestructures.

Our multidisciplinary efforts with visionary healthcare, higher education and research clients achieve measurable outcomes through metrics-driven design solutions.

Together, we create inspired solutions that improve lives.

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Price: Members $30, Nonmembers $70

Join SMPS Boston as the MSBA speaks to their new design, sustainability, and financing guidelines and programs, and how they will affect future school building projects throughout the state.

Featured Speakers:
• Katherine Craven, MSBA Executive Director
• Kathleen Timmins, Project Manager
• Karl Brown, Senior Architect

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