Mixed Plate Hawaii, by Kaoru Lovett, Graham Hart, and Ronald Ribao has won the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Look Up Film Challenge People’s Choice Award. As part of the AIA’s multi-year public awareness campaign, the Look Up Film Challenge People’s Choice Award allowed the public to vote for their favorite film that was selected by a jury comprised of architects and media professionals. The finalists eligible for the People’s Choice Award were announced last month at the inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial.

“It’s easy to see why Mixed Plate Hawaii has captured the People’s Choice Award,” said 2015 AIA President Elizabeth Chu Richter, FAIA. “The film speaks to all generations, from every background. It’s inspiring and truly makes people want to look up and celebrate the beauty of life’s diversity.”

The film looks at how Hawaii’s diverse cultural heritage has proffered a diverse built environment over time, or, as Lovett says, “life in four dimensions.” Mixed Plate Hawaii was recognized with Third Prize for the overall Film Challenge and received special recognition in the Diversity & Inclusion category. Mixed Plate Hawaii along with all the videos selected by the jury can still be viewed at ilookup.org.

“When we made this film it was really just about the thoughts that were going through our heads, we are happy, honored, and relieved to find out that so many others feel the same way or appreciate what we have done,” said Graham Hart.

“Mixed Plate Hawaii wouldn’t have done so well had it not been for the influence of the larger community. To see the impact that the greater public can have on something that we worked on is truly humbling,” said Kaoru Lovett. “The entire experience has left us eager to further explore the relationship between cinema and architecture.”

About The American Institute of Architects
Founded in 1857, the American Institute of Architects consistently works to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings, neighborhoods, and communities. Through nearly 300 state and local chapters, the AIA advocates for public policies that promote economic vitality and public wellbeing. Members adhere to a code of ethics and conduct to ensure the highest professional standards. The AIA provides members with tools and resources to assist them in their careers and business as well as engaging civic and government leaders and the public to find solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation and world. Visit http://www.aia.org.

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) today announced the launch of nine new contract documents. These include a new owner/consultant agreement with two accompanying scope of service exhibits for land surveying and geotechnical engineering, as well as six new administrative forms for use on design-build projects.

“We are constantly collaborating with industry stakeholders and practitioners to identify growing contract needs,” said Kenneth Cobleigh, Managing Director & Counsel, AIA Contract Documents. “Our customers expressed a need for a standard form of agreement owners could use to engage necessary consultants and leverage their expertise; the new C103 document addresses that need. These additions also cap off our design-build family of documents, which are preferred by the industry at large for commercial design-build projects.”

The C103™–2015, Standard Form of Agreement Between Owner and Consultant without a Predefined Scope of Consultant’s Services establishes expectations between an owner and consultant on a project. This agreement contains basic business terms related to copyrights and licenses, claims and disputes, termination or suspension, and compensation.

The accompanying scope of services exhibits include:

• C201™-2015, Standard Form of Consultant’s Services: Land Survey: This exhibit establishes the duties and responsibilities of a surveyor who is hired as a consultant by a property owner, and allows the parties to select between a boundary, topographic, or ALTA/ACSM survey.

• C202™-2015, Standard Form of Consultant’s Services: Geotechnical Engineering Services: This exhibit establishes the duties and responsibilities of a geotechnical engineer who is hired as a consultant by a property owner. It separates the geotechnical engineer’s services into four phases: explorations and testing, preparation of a geotechnical report, design services, and construction services.

Both documents are scope of services exhibits intended to be attached to AIA Document C103-2015. They may not be used as stand-alone agreements. The AIA worked with both land surveying and geotechnical engineering experts to define the parameters of these documents.

“We were pleased that the AIA sought our input on technical content during the development of C201™-2015, Standard Form of Consultant’s Services: Land Survey,” said Curt Sumner, LS, Executive Director of the National Society of Professional Surveyors. “We believe this document is an important addition to the AIA library of contract documents.”

The AIA has also added six new design-build forms to complete the Design-Build family of documents, which has quickly become one of the most popular document families in the AIA portfolio. The six new documents include:

• G741™-2015, Change Order for a Design-Build Project

• G742C™-2015, Application and Certificate for Payment for a Design-Build Project, Contractor Variation

• G742S™-2015, Application and Certificate for Payment for a Design-Build Project, Subcontractor Variation

• G743C™-2015, Continuation Sheet for a Design-Build Project, Contractor Variation

• G743S™-2015, Continuation Sheet for a Design-Build Project, Subcontractor Variation

• G745™-2015, Change Directive for a Design-Build Project

The new documents are currently available through the latest version of the AIA Contract Documents desktop software, as well as individually through AIA Documents-on-Demand® and AIA Documents-on-Demand® Plus.

About The American Institute of Architects
Founded in 1857, the American Institute of Architects consistently works to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings, neighborhoods, and communities. Through nearly 300 state and local chapters, the AIA advocates for public policies that promote economic vitality and public wellbeing. Members adhere to a code of ethics and conduct to ensure the highest professional standards. The AIA provides members with tools and resources to assist them in their careers and business as well as engaging civic and government leaders and the public to find solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation and world. Visit http://www.aia.org.

Some schools have banned junk food. Some have added longer gym classes, new nutrition classes, or even required standing desks. But childhood obesity rates are still about three times higher than they were in 1980. Now schools are adding another tool to the fight for fitter kids: Architecture.

A 1950s-era elementary school in rural Buckingham, Virginia was redesigned to help kids lose weight. The architects worked directly with public health researchers to change a long list of details based on current research, from designing a kitchen with dedicated storage space for local, seasonal fruit, to placing healthy meals at kids’-eye level in the checkout line. In a teaching kitchen, third-graders can learn to make healthy meals from the foods they grow in the school garden.

“We all know statistics about the childhood obesity epidemic, and we all know that despite our best efforts working very intensely at the individual level—or even at the population level—we haven’t made as much of an inroad as we really want to,” says Matt Trowbridge, an associate professor at the University of Virginia, who helped create the design guidelines.

The design of a school itself might matter as much as something like a gym class. “The environments in which we live affect not just our behaviors, but our lifelong attitudes about things like healthy eating and active lifestyles,” he says. “It’s also clear that it’s so much better to help prevent children from becoming obese than to try to help adults lose weight. So that makes school environments incredibly important.”

Combing through all of the available studies on school design and healthy eating, they came up with a list of dozens of design strategies architects can use. At the Virginia elementary school, one of the keys was making the commercial kitchen visible from the dining room, so students could watch as their lunch is made. Nearby, the teaching kitchen gives them a kid-safe way to learn how to make their own food, and a food lab was designed for food-related science experiments.

Some of the design guidelines are more subtle, like placing salad bars near checkout stations, or deliberately adding space in a kitchen for preparing fresh food (and eliminating deep fryers). Beyond the healthy eating interventions, the school was also designed to keep kids more active, with features like inviting stairways, walking paths, and furniture that flexes as students sit, so they aren’t completely still.

Since the school was built in 2013, the architects have continued to use the healthy eating design guidelines in other school projects. The guidelines are also free for other designers to use. A redesign can have a major impact; Sorensen points out that most school buildings are at least 50 years old, with “kitchens and cafeterias that have hardly been touched since the idea of school lunch came about in the 1930s.”

“We can’t just change what’s on the menu and expect to see the changes we hope to find in children,” Sorensen says. The key, she says, is for architects to work with multi-disciplinary teams, since a single group or solution on its own likely can’t make enough of a change in health.

The school gardens also offer community space for growing food, so whole families can start eating healthier. “We are dealing with entire communities, rural-to-urban, that are struggling with healthy food access and food deserts,” says Dina Sorensen, project designer from VMDO, the architecture firm that redesigned the elementary school. “How can those communities impart the value and importance of healthy food at school in the context of their own need to re-build healthy food infrastructure?” The Buckingham project, she says, shows a school truly becoming a community asset and a teaching tool.

Since the school was built in 2013, the architects have continued to use the healthy eating design guidelines in other school projects. The guidelines are also free for other designers to use. A redesign can have a major impact; Sorensen points out that most school buildings are at least 50 years old, with “kitchens and cafeterias that have hardly been touched since the idea of school lunch came about in the 1930s.”

“We can’t just change what’s on the menu and expect to see the changes we hope to find in children,” Sorensen says. The key, she says, is for architects to work with multi-disciplinary teams, since a single group or solution on its own likely can’t make enough of a change in health.

It’s an idea that’s quickly spreading. The American Institute of Architects now has a “design and health” leadership group with a team of experts from a range of fields. And similar collaborations are starting to happen for other social issues.

“Architects are expert at designing buildings, not studying people and their behaviors or the impact architecture has on a whole spectrum of human and ecological systems,” says Sorensen. “But we can collaborate and cross-pollinate with those who do, and marvel at the results of a new architecture for the sustainable future.” –

On the heels of recording its strongest pace of growth since 2007, there continues to be an increasing level of demand for design services signaled in the latest Architecture Billings Index (ABI). As a leading economic indicator of construction activity, the ABI reflects the approximate nine to twelve month lead time between architecture billings and construction spending. The American Institute of Architects (AIA) reported the August ABI score was 53.0, down from a mark of 55.8 in July. This score reflects an increase in design activity (any score above 50 indicates an increase in billings). The new projects inquiry index was 62.6, following a very strong mark of 66.0 the previous month.

The AIA has added a new indicator measuring the trends in new design contracts at architecture firms that can provide a strong signal of the direction of future architecture billings. The score for design contracts in August was 56.9.

“One of the key triggers for accelerating growth at architecture firms is that long-stalled construction projects are starting to come back to life in many areas across the country,” said AIA Chief Economist Kermit Baker, Hon. AIA, PhD. “Long awaited access to credit from lending institutions and an increasing comfort level in the overall economy has helped revitalize the commercial real estate sector in recent months. Additionally, though, a crucial component to a broader industry-wide recovery is the emerging demand for new projects such as education facilities, government buildings and, in some cases, hospitals.”

Key August ABI highlights:

• Regional averages: Northeast (58.1) , South (55.1), West (52.5), Midwest (51.0)

• Sector index breakdown: multi-family residential (58.1), mixed practice (57.1), institutional (54.0), commercial / industrial (50.4)

• Project inquiries index: 62.6

• Design contracts index: 56.9

The regional and sector categories are calculated as a 3-month moving average, whereas the national index, design contracts and inquiries are monthly numbers.

About the AIA Architecture Billings Index
The Architecture Billings Index (ABI), produced by the AIA Economics & Market Research Group, is a leading economic indicator that provides an approximately nine to twelve month glimpse into the future of nonresidential construction spending activity. The diffusion indexes contained in the full report are derived from a monthly “Work-on-the-Boards” survey that is sent to a panel of AIA member-owned firms. Participants are asked whether their billings increased, decreased, or stayed the same in the month that just ended as compared to the prior month, and the results are then compiled into the ABI. These monthly results are also seasonally adjusted to allow for comparison to prior months. The monthly ABI index scores are centered around 50, with scores above 50 indicating an aggregate increase in billings, and scores below 50 indicating a decline. The regional and sector data are formulated using a three-month moving average. More information on the ABI and the analysis of its relationship to construction activity can be found in the recently released White Paper, Designing the Construction Future: Reviewing the Performance and Extending the Applications of the AIA’s Architecture Billings Index on the AIA web site.

About The American Institute of Architects
Founded in 1857, members of the American Institute of Architects consistently work to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings, neighborhoods, and communities. Through nearly 300 state and local chapters, the AIA advocates for public policies that promote economic vitality and public well being. Members adhere to a code of ethics and conduct to ensure the highest professional standards. The AIA provides members with tools and resources to assist them in their careers and business as well as engaging civic and government leaders, and the public to find solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation and world. Visit http://www.aia.org.

AIA in partnership with Houzz is making this event available live for AEC professionals who are unable to attend the event in Charleston, SC

What: For the first time, the AIA’s Custom Residential Architects Network (CRAN) and Houzz have joined together to extend the CRAN Symposium 2014 to virtual audiences. Moreover, it’s free for all attendees. Anyone can virtually join residential architects from across the country to learn, share, and discuss relevant topics in the field of residential architecture. More than 10 educational sessions will be available online.

When: Thursday, September 18, to Saturday, September 20. To view the schedule of sessions and to access the live stream visit: http://www.houzz.com/AIACRANSymposium

Who: AEC professionals across the country are cordially invited to join the ongoing conversation about what it means to design a good architectural neighbor in the 21st century. Listen in as your peers consider both traditional and Modernist architectural styles from past and present.

How: Simply visit the link above, set up a Houzz profile, which is free, and you can access the available streaming sessions.

About The American Institute of Architects
Founded in 1857, members of the American Institute of Architects consistently work to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings, neighborhoods, and communities. Through nearly 300 state and local chapters, the AIA advocates for public policies that promote economic vitality and public well being. Members adhere to a code of ethics and conduct to ensure the highest professional standards. The AIA provides members with tools and resources to assist them in their careers and business as well as engaging civic and government leaders, and the public to find solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation and world. Visit http://www.aia.org.

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Committee on Architecture for Education (CAE) has selected 11 educational and cultural facilities for this year’s CAE Educational Facility Design Awards. The CAE Design Excellence Award honors educational facilities that the jury believes should serve as an example of a superb place in which to learn, furthering the client’s mission, goals and educational program while demonstrating excellence in architectural design. These projects exemplify innovation through the client’s educational goals through responsive and responsible programming, planning and design. Function and surrounding regional and community context are valued as part of the planning and design process as well as sustainability.

Media interested in obtaining high resolution images, please contact Matt Tinder: mtinder@aia.org

Baltimore Design School; Baltimore
Ziger/Snead Architects

Baltimore Design School is a new Baltimore City Public combined middle and high school with a focus on fashion, architecture, and graphic design. The new school is created from an abandoned historic factory building. The building’s transformation from blight to a state-of-the-art facility within the confines of a minimal budget demonstrates the power of design through best practices for historic renovation, adaptive reuse, educational design, and sustainable design. A driving force in creating the school was the desire to develop creativity and design-informed critical thinking skills for public school students.

Buckingham County Primary & Elementary Schools at the Carter G. Woodson Education Complex; Dillwyn, VA
VMDO Architects, P.C.

Two Virginia mid-century schools are transformed into a cutting-edge, holistic learning environment for K-5 students with the aim to promote connectivity, creativity, health, and well-being. Evidence-based healthy design principles – integrated in the campus landscape and co-created by the client, architect, and a team of public health researchers – promote healthy eating, nutrition education, physical activity, and well-being as a response to the national childhood obesity epidemic. The campus works to unlock the health and learning potential of 21st-century students while fostering design-research partnerships that re-define sustainability, human health, and professional collaboration.

Drexel University College of Media Arts and Design (CoMAD) URBN Center; Philadelphia
MSR (Meyer, Scherer & Rockcastle, Ltd.)

The respectful repurposing of a landmark Venturi, Scott Brown decorated shed provides a new home for Drexel University’s College of Media Arts and Design. Key goals driving the project include bringing together disparate departments in one location and encouraging cross-collaboration between disciplines. To transform the former 130,000 square-foot office building and 13,000 square-foot annex, the designers embraced the realities of the shed—a cost-effective, four-story commercial box. The design concept focuses on respecting the original intent, making more with less, offering adaptable spaces for learning, and providing opportunities for learning through presentation.

University of Chicago Child Development Center – Stony Island; Chicago
Wheeler Kearns Architects

When faced with the question “How do you design a day care for the children of future Nobel laureates?”, one approach seemed promising. Instead of creating another place dominated by primary colors and synthetic play equipment, children could be offered an opportunity to discover natural phenomena in the natural world. Discovering first principles first-hand surrounded by minimally processed natural materials. Consequently, the design emphasizes the natural landscape over the built-one, centered around two playscapes with a footprint larger than the building itself. The playscapes conceptually graft onto the historic Frederick Law Olmstead landscape located across the street in Jackson Park. Materials constructed by nature either from the atmosphere (trees, plants, wood) or from the earth (boulders, rocks, sand) dominate.

Wilkes Elementary School; Bainbridge Island, WA
Mahlum

Wilkes Elementary School was designed to support dynamic styles of teaching and learning. Classrooms are located at the heart and linked on each end, providing a circulation pattern that prevents both the feeling and effect of isolation. Clusters of classrooms break down the scale and create four intimate learning communities. This arrangement also fosters collaboration and connectivity, and creates opportunities for variation in scales of learning – from multi-classroom gatherings, to intimate individual experiences. Wilkes addresses the needs of the whole child, so that powerful learning happens everywhere.

Central Arizona College, Maricopa Campus; Maricopa, AZ
SmithGroupJJR

Known for its history as a pre-railroad stagecoach town, the town of Maricopa has balanced its agricultural and Native American identities for the past century. Most recently Maricopa, a community 40 miles south of Phoenix, has been chronicled by the New York Times as a bedroom community boomtown gone bust. Central Arizona College has made an investment in the community and is betting on its future. This campus represents a glimmer of hope in an area struck by the national recession.

Coastline Community College, Newport Beach Campus; Newport Beach, CA
LPA, INC

The new interdisciplinary Newport Beach Campus provides a total of approximately 66,800 square feet to Coastline Community College, as well as hardscape and landscape. The project also includes construction of a 260-space, on-site, parking lot directly adjacent to the structure. Key sustainable features, such as storm water management, natural ventilation, green roofs, living walls, maximized daylight and views of the ocean, are highlighted to achieve LEED Gold rating. The project exceeds CA Title 24 energy code by 33%.

James B. Hunt Jr. Library at North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC
Architect: Clark Nexsen Associated Firm: Snohetta

Large open spaces connect all floors of the library, and the use of stairs is emphasized to ensure an interactive and social environment in-between more focused study areas. Designed to LEED® Silver requirements, the building features abundant natural light and expansive views of the nearby lake. Fritted glass and a fixed external aluminum shading system help diminish heat gain and maximize views and ambient natural light. Ceiling-mounted active chilled beams and radiant panels provide heating and cooling. Rain gardens and green roofs manage storm water.

Nathan Hale High School Modernization; Seattle
Mahlum

Nathan Hale is a progressive, public high school known for its collaborative, presentation-based curriculum and strong community connection. This significant facility modernization and addition to the 1960’s structure creates a flexible teaching facility that puts student life at the center of the school and unites the campus community. The design allows the building to breathe fresh air and daylight while respecting the existing structural rhythm. Light-filled halls and classrooms, as well the building transparency, express the school’s values and provide a healthy, inspirational environment.

PAVE Academy Charter School; Brooklyn, NY
Mitchell | Giurgola Architects, LLP

PAVE Academy is a 450-seat K-8 public charter school located on an isolated corner lot in the Red Hook section of Brooklyn. The design of the school was informed by the PAVE leadership team whose goals included creating a community friendly school that would support significant parent involvement – essential to student success – and the needs of a particularly high-needs population living in poverty. Children arrive early for a quiet breakfast and stay well into the afternoon with learning and play to fill a void many face at home.

Raisbeck Aviation High School; Tukwila, WA
Bassetti Architects

Raisbeck Aviation High School was conceived as a response to Highline School District’s proximity to the aviation industry, a deep desire to give students access to college and engineering professions, and an educational vision that melds hands-on, project-based learning with academic rigor. The new 400-student STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) school enables students to flourish through co-location with the Museum of Flight and immersion in aerospace and aviation. The design supports this program physically, visually, and symbolically with project labs for aircraft and robotics construction, state-of-the-art science labs, classrooms, and a multi-purpose gathering space. Even the image of the school reflects its mission with its streamlined, carefully crafted form, inspired by the leading edge of a wing.

The 2014 CAE Educational Facility Design Awards jury includes: John R. Dale, FAIA (Chair), Harley Ellis Devereaux; Claire Gallagher, Assoc. AIA, Georgian Court University, School of Education; Fred Dust, IDEO; Dutch MacDonald, AIA, MAYA Design and Marsha Maytum, FAIA, Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects.

About The American Institute of Architects
Founded in 1857, members of the American Institute of Architects consistently work to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings, neighborhoods, and communities. Through nearly 300 state and local chapters, the AIA advocates for public policies that promote economic vitality and public well being. Members adhere to a code of ethics and conduct to ensure the highest professional standards. The AIA provides members with tools and resources to assist them in their careers and business as well as engaging civic and government leaders, and the public to find solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation and world. Visit http://www.aia.org.

The last three months have shown steadily increasing demand for design services and the Architecture Billings Index (ABI) is now at its highest level since 2007. As a leading economic indicator of construction activity, the ABI reflects the approximate nine to twelve month lead time between architecture billings and construction spending. The American Institute of Architects (AIA) reported the July ABI score was 55.8, up noticeably from a mark of 53.5 in June. This score reflects an increase in design activity (any score above 50 indicates an increase in billings). The new projects inquiry index was 66.0, following a very strong mark of 66.4 the previous month.

The AIA has added a new indicator measuring the trends in new design contracts at architecture firms that can provide a strong signal of the direction of future architecture billings. The score for design contracts in July was 54.9.

“Business conditions for the design and construction marketplace, and those industries associated with it, appear to be well-positioned for continued growth in the coming months,” said AIA Chief Economist Kermit Baker, Hon. AIA, PhD. “The key to a more widespread boost in design activity continues to be the institutional sector which is starting to exhibit signs of life after languishing for the better part of the last five-plus years.”

Key July ABI highlights:

• Regional averages: Northeast (55.5), South (55.1), Midwest (54.1), West (53.5)

• Sector index breakdown: mixed practice (61.0), multi-family residential (56.5), institutional (53.3), commercial / industrial (51.2)

• Project inquiries index: 66.0

• Design contracts index: 54.9

The regional and sector categories are calculated as a 3-month moving average, whereas the national index, design contracts and inquiries are monthly numbers.

About the AIA Architecture Billings Index
The Architecture Billings Index (ABI), produced by the AIA Economics & Market Research Group, is a leading economic indicator that provides an approximately nine to twelve month glimpse into the future of nonresidential construction spending activity. The diffusion indexes contained in the full report are derived from a monthly “Work-on-the-Boards” survey that is sent to a panel of AIA member-owned firms. Participants are asked whether their billings increased, decreased, or stayed the same in the month that just ended as compared to the prior month, and the results are then compiled into the ABI. These monthly results are also seasonally adjusted to allow for comparison to prior months. The monthly ABI index scores are centered around 50, with scores above 50 indicating an aggregate increase in billings, and scores below 50 indicating a decline. The regional and sector data are formulated using a three-month moving average. More information on the ABI and the analysis of its relationship to construction activity can be found in the recently released White Paper, Designing the Construction Future: Reviewing the Performance and Extending the Applications of the AIA’s Architecture Billings Index on the AIA web site.

About The American Institute of Architects
Founded in 1857, members of the American Institute of Architects consistently work to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings, neighborhoods, and communities. Through nearly 300 state and local chapters, the AIA advocates for public policies that promote economic vitality and public well being. Members adhere to a code of ethics and conduct to ensure the highest professional standards. The AIA provides members with tools and resources to assist them in their careers and business as well as engaging civic and government leaders, and the public to find solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation and world. Visit http://www.aia.org.